How to Grow Cayenne Peppers in Pots or Containers

How to Grow Cayenne Peppers in Pots or Containers

Cayenne Peppers growing in a container

How to Grow Cayenne Peppers in Pots or Containers is so easy. It is actually one of my favorite things to grow. I never waste a pepper. They are easy to freeze. No blanching required. Perfect for drying into pepper flakes. Here are some of my best tips for growing massive yields of cayenne peppers. Although there are many varieties of Cayenne Peppers, I love to grow the Hot Dragon Cayenne Peppers.

cayenne peppers red and green growing in pot beside banana peppers.
Cayenne Peppers growing beside my sweet banana peppers- Credit Good Gardener

Planting Your Cayenne Pepper Seeds

  • Start your seeds indoors around 8 – 10 weeks before the last frost. They like to face North as well.
  • Make sure you don’t use the soil from your previous plants. Especially tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, or potatoes to avoid problems or diseases. Do not use garden soil for these peppers, use a commercial blend.
  • Place seeds in the soil 1/4″ deep and I recommend one per planter around 18 – 24″ although I have used a 10″ before.
  • If you’re going to transplant them, wait until you have a few leaves on the stems.
  • Harden them by putting them outside during the day and then bringing them in at night.
  • I don’t use any fertilizers I just use an all-purpose blend. The reason is I like them hot. They tend to be hotter if they have less food or fertilizer added to the soil.
  • Plant them near tomatoes, basil, parsley, and carrots. Never plant them near the fennel. Fennel does not grow well with others.
  • To avoid diseases keep the soil evenly moist and not over-water them.

Caring for your Cayenne Peppers

They are very easy to maintain and care for. Keep them evenly watered especially during hot and humid weather. Always use commercial potting soil rather than garden soil. Watch for any signs of diseases.

Pests and Diseases in Cayenne Pepper Plants

The two culprits you need to watch for are the Tobacco Mosaic Virus and the Tomato Root-Knot Nematodes. You can use the Pepper Disease Identification to give you further information.

Harvesting Your Cayenne Peppers

What I love about these peppers is they can be picked at any time but I do like to wait until they have turned red. The easiest ways to preserve your cayenne peppers are to freeze them (no blanching required) and to dry them. I can usually get two years’ worth of pepper flakes from 2 plants. You can dry them slowly in your oven if you do not have a dehydrator. I place them on tin foil and in the oven for about 6 hours on low. 200 degrees F.

fresh cayenne's on tin foil and cookie sheet drying
Dried flakes of the cayenne peppers on the cookie sheet when done drying

My Recommendations

Written by
Our Busy Bee
Join the discussion